Thursday, December 25, 2008

Quick-Peel a hard boiled egg!

I really like this fast, easy method of preparing a high protein, low carb diet mainstay of the Barbarian Diet- the hard boiled egg!

Also, I just read a GREAT overview of the dietary shenanigans of the past 50 years or so detailing how the high carb, low fat diet became gospel- WRONGLY!

Read Gary Taube's book- "Good Calories, Bad Calories".

Very erudite- but fascinating- I read it in two long sittings, cover-to-cover.

If you want the bottom line, just read page 454 in the book; the summary:

1.Dietary fat, whether saturated or not, is not a cause of obesity, heart disease, or any other chronic disease of civilization.

2. The problem is the carbohydrates in the diet, their effect on insulin secretion, and thus the hormonal regulation of homeostasis-the entire harmonic ensemble of the human body. The more easily digestible and refined the carbohydrates, the greater the effect on our health, weight, and well=being.

3. Sugars- sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup specifically-are particularly harmful, probably because the combination of fructose and glucose simultaneously elevates insulin levels while overloading the liver with carbohydrates.

4. Through their direct effect on insulin and blood sugar, refined carbohydrates, starches, and sugars are the dietary cause of coronary heart diseaase and diabetes. They are the most likely dietary causes of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and the other chronic diseases of civilization.

These are the first four of 10 points that summarize the conclusions of the author of the book. VERY different from what you'll hear spouted by mainstream nutritionists...
And, for my money, much more correct!

Saturday, November 29, 2008

The Barbarian Diet


This is the way to eat: like our barbarian ancestors ate!

Lean meats, fish, eggs, vegetables, fruits, and whole grains,( in moderation).

The meats, fish, eggs, vegetables and fruits are to be eaten in unlimited quantities- let your appetite be your guide!

Also, what would a good barbarian do in the evening? Why, quaff beer and ale, of course!!

I honestly believe that, coupled with a good exercise program, such as is espoused elsewhere in this blog, the above diet will give you the best health you can acquire!

It's not really that complicated to eat properly:

Just eliminate any "engineered" foods; those things that have been invented, or "engineered" within the past 100 years or so- white flour, sugar, corn sugar, soda pop, candy, (except for limited amounts of dark chocolate!), potato chips and their ilk... you get the idea!

Actually, if you think about it, all of this is really just common sense. (If you ignore the press, "diet experts", and the like). We all really KNOW what we should be eating...
we just don't listen to our own inner knowledge.

But, now you know: ignore the "experts"-

EAT LIKE A BARBARIAN!

Thursday, November 20, 2008

DDP and YRG help disabled veteran walk again.

Unbelievable transformation!

It's all about determination.

Static contraction training a scam



Maxick
I experimented for over a year, using static contraction training exclusively. This is training with the heaviest weights you can manage, over only the strongest range of your motion (the last inch or two of , say, a bench press.)

I would load the bar in my power rack, and squat it, press it, curl it, whatever, once per week! That was it- you need to let your "muscles rebuild"! says Pete Sisco, the expounder of the static contraction training principle...

I did indeed get so I could push, and support statically some very massive poundages. I think I gained the most, though, from pressing the bar into the pins of the rack, isometrically, for some seconds before letting up.

I also gained muscle mass, and fat. Most of the mass you'll gain using this method will be in your thighs, butt, chest and, unfortunately, your belly.

If you've ever seen Pete Sisco, you can envision what this training will do for you... think old Russian olympic lifter...

Before that, I used Superslow training system, wherein you lift a weight 10 seconds up, 10 seconds down. Very taxing, and very effective. But, again, Ken Hutchens, the originator, suggests you train perhaps one time per week... you will gain, but in the fashion of Static contraction/big butt/gut training. Ken was on the right trail, but he is reinventing the wheel...

John E. Peterson has never lost the training of the olden times; early 1900's era strongman training: isometrics, Visualized resistance (aka "muscle control"), calisthenics...

Visualized resistance, John calls it Dynamic Visualized Resistance, or DVR's, is particularly intrigueing:

You imagine, whilst moving your body through various movements, the resistance, and move in slow motion against your own, self-imposed resistance! Sounds wacky, but the more you practice it, the more control over your muscles, and the greater strength you get!

As near as I can tell, this was originally done my MAXICK, a german strongman from 100 years ago; he built his strength using this method exclusively. (And his physique, which was also amazing!) You can check him out on the MAXALDING website, which is what his training system was called.

www.maxalding.co.uk/

Exercises are there, lots and lots of information; some of it fascinating.

I saw one photo of Maxick, holding a beer glass in one hand, holding a 240 pound man over his head with one hand, and not spilling the full glass of beer! I'll look for it, and post it when I do...

And Maxick only weighed about 150 pounds!! No fat butt/gut on this boy!!

So, check out the real deals; go back to the future!

www.transformetrics.com

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Gardening to keep green smoothie costs low

This is really smart:

Use your overgrown, almost-to-be-wasted produce in your vitamix smoothies; and future-to-be smoothies! (Via the future, in your freezer)

My own compost pile is much simpler:
Just a pile of refuse.

It gradually becomes amazing stuff, the best thing for your garden you can imagine!!
Jay

HealthyNewsAndReviews.com Vita-Mix Soup

I am going to make this soup!

I love my vitamix, and use it daily!

Tuesday, October 21, 2008

Are we headed for a depression? (Yes, in 2010)

Harry Dent's New Forecast

In a recent article from Canadian Business Online, Harry Dent explains why his forecast for the Dow's high was way off. Basically, Dent says that he underestimated the strength of the bull market in commodities and the negative geopolitical environment.

Dent's overall outlook for the future goes like this: The U.S. economy will be in recession between June and October. That will take the pressure off commodities, which will fall throughout the second-half of 2008. Later this year into early next, a rally in stocks will follow. But then? That’s it. “Between mid- to late 2009 and late 2010, runaway commodity markets collide with the broad peaking of the baby-boom spending wave, and that’s going to create a crash,” says Dent. “The boomers will be spending until late 2009. After that, the extra support the boomers delivered is going to progressively fall out of the economy, and that’s going to be the final nail in the coffin on the postwar expansion of U.S. debt.”

U.S. stock markets will sag for a decade. Investors will have to be nimble to preserve their wealth. Between mid-2010 and mid-2011, Dent suggests locking up money in high-yielding, long-term bonds and leaving it there for the decade — the years between 2010 and 2020 will be a rare period in which bonds will outperform stocks. Dent’s advice is to be ready to go all-cash when the crash comes and “then sit for a year and wait for the smoke to clear.” “By 2012, the crash will be over and serious deflation will take hold as the housing, oil and stock market bubbles deflate — that’s going to drive up the value of bonds,” he adds. “For two out of four seasons of the larger cycle, stocks do well. But this is going to be one season they don’t.”
Dent also recommends picking up Asian and health-care stocks in late 2010. The decade of economic reorganization will lay the groundwork for the emergence of China and India as major economic players in the early 2020s, so it will be smart to get in early on the empires of the future. “Let the crash hit, and then buy China, India and health care,” says Dent. “International and emerging-market stocks will do better than U.S. stocks in this period, and everything is going to be on sale.”

Thanks to the Stock Market Advantage for the above!

Jay

Sunday, September 28, 2008

low tech pushup station for total fitness

How to set up a pushup station in your shed,garage, or outdoors in order to perform "Transformetrics", ala John E. Peterson, readily... on your way to work, way home, working around the yard, or anytime at all- just stop, and do a bunch! No special skill needed, but the results, done in high volume, will surprise you!

Also, you can gaze at your John Deere as you exercise! (What a bonus!!)

Saturday, September 13, 2008

My 15 minutes of fame, revisited from January, 2008

*After 30 years, local postal carrier trades foot route for one on French Island
By CHRIS HUBBUCH | La Crosse Tribunefile:///Users/jaybowers/Desktop/Picture%20clipping%202.pictClipping

.
Jay Bowers has lived for decades in a farmhouse outside Onalaska, but some of his closest neighbors are in south La Crosse.

Bowers is a mail carrier, one of 62 who deliver to 48 routes in the city of La Crosse.
After 30 years as a United States Postal Service letter carrier in La Crosse Jay Bowers has given up his foot route for a driving route. PETER THOMSON photo

“We’re the face of the federal government,” he says.

For the past 16 years, his office has been route 23, a 15-square-block postage stamp nestled between Cass and Market streets under Grandad Bluff. Five days a week — in the proverbial snow, rain, heat, gloom of night — Bowers hiked upwards of 10 miles carrying letters and bills, birthday cards and catalogs to 401 front doors.

It wasn’t his neighborhood, but the gregarious postman knew his customers as well as his own neighbors. He saw children grow up and move away. He was a lifeline for elderly people who counted on his daily visits. He even saved a man’s life.

“You know every name and person in that house,” Bowers said. “You know more about people than you sometimes want to know.”

On Jan. 17, Bowers walked the route for the last time.

This week, he is adjusting to a new route on French Island, where the mailboxes are on posts and Bowers can deliver in a truck. It’s one of the most coveted routes, he said, and after 30 years of walking, he was ready for a break.

At 55, Bowers is trim and has a boyish face frosted by white hair and a close-cropped beard. He’s avoided most of the sprained ankles, wrenched knees and hip replacements that generally come with the job.

“Walking is a good thing,” he said. “What we do is too much.”

He won’t miss the aches and pains. Or the cold. But he will miss the people. “I hate to leave the people behind,” he said. “I feel terrible.”

On his last day, Bowers left a card bidding them farewell. He received dozens of cards in reply. Some contained cash. All had personal notes.

“I always enjoyed our little chats,” wrote Jane Beissel, who bought her mother’s house on Market Street about a year ago when her mother moved to a nursing home. Beissel said Bowers would always stop and talk and ask about her mother.

“He was always smiling and happy, no matter what the weather’s like,” she said.

By the time Bowers got home that last day, he already had an e-mail from one resident’s daughter who is away at college.

He’s seen a number of kids like her grow up. “You’re like a hero when they’re little,” he said. “You bring stuff every day. It’s so exciting.”

For elderly residents, a mailman can be a lifeline, the one person who comes to their door every day.

Bowers occasionally helped up people who had fallen. In 2004, he noticed one man hadn’t picked up his mail. The door was locked, and the neighbors hadn’t seen him. When firefighters broke down the door, they found the man wedged between his bed and the wall where he had been trapped for two days. Bowers was later cited by the postal service for going beyond the call of duty.

Some longtime residents on route 23 say they never knew their carrier before Bowers.

“I hadn’t noticed the other mail carrier because he didn’t ask for attention,” said Dorothy Lawrence, who’s lived on 23rd Street for about 25 years. “Jay was always very friendly. We’d see him on the street, and he’d wave.”

“We just loved him,” said Mary Ellen Gouff. “We didn’t really know the other ones.”

Bowers sometimes discovered shared interests with people on his route. Once, he peeked at a catalog of blues records he was delivering to Fern Smith. He returned the favor by turning her on to some other music catalogs he knew about.

Smith and her husband would often chat with Bowers about their shared interests — music, books, old cars and cats.

“We’ve had favorite mailmen, but none as good as Jay,” said Smith, who has lived on South 20th Street since 1973. “We’re really going to miss him.”

Bowers, who grew up in La Grange, Ill., started carrying mail during the summer when he was a student at Illinois State University. He majored in English and jokes that’s why he became “a man of letters.”

In 1978, Bowers got his first route in Skokie, Ill. He liked the work, but the pay didn’t go very far in Chicago. Bowers and his wife, Jane, had visited relatives near La Crosse, and in 1980, they found a house for sale in the town of Onalaska.

No one in Chicago could understand why he would want to leave, but he and Jane knew it was where they wanted to be.

With a daughter in college, Bowers doesn’t plan to retire for at least a few more years. But the new driving route should leave him with a little more energy for his blogs (http://oldmailman.blogspot.com, http://vintagehealthandfitness.blogspot.com), where he writes about everything from his job to his interests in fitness, food, old trucks and his barbershop quartet, the Blufftones.

“It’s either that or send endless e-mails to all my acquaintances and drive them crazy,” he said. “No one sends letters anymore — well, they do. … a lot more junk mail and a lot more packages — because people order stuff over the Internet.”

Contact reporter Chris Hubbuch at (608) 791-8217 or at chris.hubbuch@lee.net.
.

.
Jay Bowers has lived for decades in a farmhouse outside Onalaska, but some of his closest neighbors are in south La Crosse.

Bowers is a mail carrier, one of 62 who deliver to 48 routes in the city of La Crosse.
After 30 years as a United States Postal Service letter carrier in La Crosse Jay Bowers has given up his foot route for a driving route. PETER THOMSON photo

“We’re the face of the federal government,” he says.

For the past 16 years, his office has been route 23, a 15-square-block postage stamp nestled between Cass and Market streets under Grandad Bluff. Five days a week — in the proverbial snow, rain, heat, gloom of night — Bowers hiked upwards of 10 miles carrying letters and bills, birthday cards and catalogs to 401 front doors.

It wasn’t his neighborhood, but the gregarious postman knew his customers as well as his own neighbors. He saw children grow up and move away. He was a lifeline for elderly people who counted on his daily visits. He even saved a man’s life.

“You know every name and person in that house,” Bowers said. “You know more about people than you sometimes want to know.”

On Jan. 17, Bowers walked the route for the last time.

This week, he is adjusting to a new route on French Island, where the mailboxes are on posts and Bowers can deliver in a truck. It’s one of the most coveted routes, he said, and after 30 years of walking, he was ready for a break.

At 55, Bowers is trim and has a boyish face frosted by white hair and a close-cropped beard. He’s avoided most of the sprained ankles, wrenched knees and hip replacements that generally come with the job.

“Walking is a good thing,” he said. “What we do is too much.”

He won’t miss the aches and pains. Or the cold. But he will miss the people. “I hate to leave the people behind,” he said. “I feel terrible.”

On his last day, Bowers left a card bidding them farewell. He received dozens of cards in reply. Some contained cash. All had personal notes.

“I always enjoyed our little chats,” wrote Jane Beissel, who bought her mother’s house on Market Street about a year ago when her mother moved to a nursing home. Beissel said Bowers would always stop and talk and ask about her mother.

“He was always smiling and happy, no matter what the weather’s like,” she said.

By the time Bowers got home that last day, he already had an e-mail from one resident’s daughter who is away at college.

He’s seen a number of kids like her grow up. “You’re like a hero when they’re little,” he said. “You bring stuff every day. It’s so exciting.”

For elderly residents, a mailman can be a lifeline, the one person who comes to their door every day.

Bowers occasionally helped up people who had fallen. In 2004, he noticed one man hadn’t picked up his mail. The door was locked, and the neighbors hadn’t seen him. When firefighters broke down the door, they found the man wedged between his bed and the wall where he had been trapped for two days. Bowers was later cited by the postal service for going beyond the call of duty.

Some longtime residents on route 23 say they never knew their carrier before Bowers.

“I hadn’t noticed the other mail carrier because he didn’t ask for attention,” said Dorothy Lawrence, who’s lived on 23rd Street for about 25 years. “Jay was always very friendly. We’d see him on the street, and he’d wave.”

“We just loved him,” said Mary Ellen Gouff. “We didn’t really know the other ones.”

Bowers sometimes discovered shared interests with people on his route. Once, he peeked at a catalog of blues records he was delivering to Fern Smith. He returned the favor by turning her on to some other music catalogs he knew about.

Smith and her husband would often chat with Bowers about their shared interests — music, books, old cars and cats.

“We’ve had favorite mailmen, but none as good as Jay,” said Smith, who has lived on South 20th Street since 1973. “We’re really going to miss him.”

Bowers, who grew up in La Grange, Ill., started carrying mail during the summer when he was a student at Illinois State University. He majored in English and jokes that’s why he became “a man of letters.”

In 1978, Bowers got his first route in Skokie, Ill. He liked the work, but the pay didn’t go very far in Chicago. Bowers and his wife, Jane, had visited relatives near La Crosse, and in 1980, they found a house for sale in the town of Onalaska.

No one in Chicago could understand why he would want to leave, but he and Jane knew it was where they wanted to be.

With a daughter in college, Bowers doesn’t plan to retire for at least a few more years. But the new driving route should leave him with a little more energy for his blogs (http://oldmailman.blogspot.com, http://vintagehealthandfitness.blogspot.com), where he writes about everything from his job to his interests in fitness, food, old trucks and his barbershop quartet, the Blufftones.

“It’s either that or send endless e-mails to all my acquaintances and drive them crazy,” he said. “No one sends letters anymore — well, they do. … a lot more junk mail and a lot more packages — because people order stuff over the Internet.”

Contact reporter Chris Hubbuch at (608) 791-8217 or at chris.hubbuch@lee.net.
.

Sunday, September 7, 2008

The Paleo diet excerpt


Here is an excerpt from the Paleo Diet folks: They advocate a really healthy, common sense diet, that resembles what our ancient ancestors subsisted on:



Exceptional Health of our Hunter-Gatherer Ancestors Loren Cordain

Our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate diets focused on meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, maybe nuts. And they were consistently described as displaying exceptional health, fitness, strength, and vitality.

If you are like most people, you probably know very little about hunter-gatherers. In fact, many people assume that Stone Age people and contemporary hunter-gatherers would have been in "continual fear and danger of violent death" and their lives would have been "poor, nasty, brutish, and short", as suggested in The Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes in 1651.

In reality, the historical and anthropological record simply does not support this line of reasoning. Almost without exception, descriptions of hunter-gatherers by early European explorers and adventurers showed these people to be healthy, fit, strong, and vivacious. These are the same characteristics that can be yours when you follow the dietary exercise principles that we lay out in The Paleo Diet, this newsletter, and our other programs and services.

Historical Descriptions of Hunter-gatherers

George Catlin, the famous chronicler of American Indians, circa 1832-39, glowingly used these words to describe the Crow tribe: "They are really a handsome and well-formed set of men as can be seen in any part of the world. There is a sort of ease and grace added to their dignity of manners, which give them the air of gentlemen at once. I observed the other day, that most of them were over six feet high . . ." "It is but to paint a vast country of green field, where the men are all red - where meat is the staff of life . . . ." .

Cabeza de Vaca, the Spanish Explorer, saw native Florida Indians in 1527 and called them, "wonderfully well built, spare, very strong and very swift. Similar observations of the indigenous inhabitants of Florida were made in 1564 by the French explorer Rene Laudonniere, who noted that, "The agility of the women is so great that they can swim over great rivers, bearing their children upon one of their arms. They climb up, also, very nimbly upon the highest trees in the country. . . . even the most ancient women of the country dance with the others". In his account of California Indians in 1869, Begert notes, "the Californians are seldom sick. They are in general strong, hardy, and much healthier than the many thousands who live daily in abundance and on the choicest fare that the skill of Parisian cooks can prepare".

Captain Cook who visited New Zealand in 1772 was particularly impressed by the good health of the native Maori, "It cannot be thought strange that these people enjoy perfect and uninterrupted health. In all our visits to their towns, where young and old, men and women, crowded about us, prompted by the same curiosity that carried us to look at them, we never saw a single person who appeared to have any bodily complaint, nor among the numbers that we have seen naked did we perceive the slightest eruption upon the skin, or any marks that an eruption had been left behind . . . . A further proof that human nature is here untainted with disease is the great number of old men that we saw. . . . appeared to be very ancient , yet none of them were decrepit; and though not equal to the young in muscular strength, were not a whit behind them in cheerfulness and v ivacity."

So, now that we know how the historical descriptions of early European explorers read. But to more deeply understand why our genome hasn't kept up with our dietary changes, it is helpful to conceptualize how much time has our ancestors ate a Paleolithic type diet, compared to how long the modern diet has been around. That's what we'll take a look at next time.


This Week's Food Tip - Paleo on the Go Nell Stephenson

Are you finding it challenging to stick with your Paleo Diet when you're always on the go? With a little bit of preparation, this can become an absolute non-issue.

* Keep hard-boiled eggs in the fridge for a source of quick protein. Have the egg whites and save the yolks for your dog to keep his coat shiny!

* Chop up enough carrots, bell peppers, celery, broccoli or whatever other veggies you enjoy to last a few days and snack on those with a handful of raw walnuts (non- perishable, so keep 'em handy!) in the car, or at your desk between meetings.

* Make it a priority to go grocery shopping two or three times per week. Don't let yourself run out of fresh fruits & veg. Turn grabbing a piece (or a few) of fruit before you leave home into a daily habit.

* Keep it simple. If you've been keeping on top of your 'hour in the kitchen', you'll not be in short supply of fresh, healthy food that you've prepared yourself. Don't feel as though you have to spend tons of time cooking gourmet meals in order to keep on top of things.

* Finally, don't be afraid to think outside of the standard foods for each meal. Who ever said that eggs are the only protein option for breakfast or that you can't combine something sweet (like an apple) with something savory (like a fresh piece of wild salmon). It may sound like an odd couple, but the point is that if you continue to try new foods and combinations, you're not going to get bored!

News and Upcoming Events

In Search of the Perfect Human Diet, a documentary being produced by CJ Hunt, has recently found new distribution support. San Francisco's PBS station group led by KQED has come on board with a letter of official interest in both the project and in presenting it nationally to the 353 other stations in the PBS system. Check it out, and send them a donation!

On September 8, Dr. Cordain will be giving a brand new talk entitled Malaria and Rickets Represent Selective Forces for the Convergent Evolution of Adult Lactase Persistence. This will be held at Harlan ll, An International Symposium. Biodiversity in Agriculture: Domestication, Evolution, & S

Saturday, September 6, 2008

Monday, September 1, 2008

Trumpeteers - Milky White Way

Another great song! The Blufftones should do this tune...
Jay

Sam Cooke-Bring It On Home to Me [Live]

This is one great performance!
I think it's good for your (vintage) health and fitness!!
Jay

Friday, August 29, 2008

Golden Eagle Bike Engine - Journey 062608 Motorized Bicycle

This guy has gotten the bike engine I want: a golden eagle!
It sure looks fun to drive- and, think of the fitness benefits... assisted pedaling, and LOTS of time to pull over and do push ups!!

Monday, August 25, 2008

Love song to a new/old John Deere Tractor!

Here is the piece de resistance of john deere tractor love...

I wanted to post it for you all to enjoy.

I filmed it when I first bought my John Deere a few years ago.


Here is the word on tractors:

If you are moving to an "acreage", you need what they call in the industry an "estate tractor".

Don't be like me, starting out on an el cheapo "Markmaster" tractor...

Your life will be a living hell, if you get one of these cheap, mass-produced "lawn tractors"- trust me!!

Let's say you're beyond that:

"I believe I'll get a John Deere (or Cub Cadet, or Simplicity, Ariens, Sabre, or any other department store LAWN tractor)- if it's a major brand, I'll be fine!"

Wrongo. Too small, too wimpy, too underpowered, too WEAK.

"OK" you say. "I'll go the MAJOR route, and get a big, expensive, major-sized garden tractor!!

Then, I can use the PTO, and run other attachments, and do all I need to do on my multi-acre estate.

I beg to differ even here: lawn tractors are expensive, and seem like they would do whatever you would want. But they won't.


You, my friend, need a CUT! (WHAT?)

A Compact Utility Tractor- C_U_T! As the Lion would say in the Wizard of Oz- "What've they got that I ain't got??"- (besides courage?? and they have that, too!)

Bigger frame (your wife will say it's too big, and so will your neighbors. They're all wrong. It's perfect).

Very much heavy duty throughout: this translates to a really, really long life!

MUCH more torque (power)!! This is key- Diesel = happy tractor driver.

You don't need a lot of horsepower with diesel. 15 hp diesel more than equals 30 hp in gas. And the power is all in the low end, where you actually need it!

(And diesel engines will last almost forever!)

You can add attachments- rakes, front end loaders, front blades, snowblowers, rear blades, the list goes on and on... and they are category 1 attachments via the 3 point hitch. Garden tractors, use the 0 level attachments, which means they are about the strength level of Christmas tree tinsel...

AND, 20 years from now, you can SELL YOUR TRACTOR and get a BIGGER one!!

You would have gone through about 10 lawn tractors by then, and have NOTHING.


What does this have to do with "health and fitness", you ask? It's all about the proper tool for the task- you wouldn't ask your grandmother to lift a boulder in your yard, would you? Well, think of a lawn or garden tractor as your grandmother. And, your CUT is Bruce Lee/Arnold Schwarzzenegger! Think of it: you can cut your lawn, no sweat whatsoever, and then say:

"I'll be back!!"





Sunday, August 17, 2008

Pizza Bianca recipe and video- John Deere Grill!


videoHere is a great recipe, as featured in Cooke's Illustrated magazine this month. I guarantee you will like the results you will get, and the versatility afforded by using variations of this dough recipe:

You can grill it in a pan (thicker crust), directly on the grill (make these really thin), or in the oven during the long Winter months.

This is the first time I used this recipe- it turned out great!!

Here is the ingredient list:

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 2/3 cup room temperature water
1 1/4 tsp. table salt
1 1/2 tsp yeast
1 1/4 tsp sugar
5 T. virgin olive oil
1 tsp. Kosher salt
2 T. whole fresh rosemary leaves, optional

You need a stand mixer for this recipe- don't argue, it's just too wet of a dough to knead by hand.

You need a Kitchenaid mixer anyway, if you want to attend Deere J's kitchen and how- to classes- just get one!! NOW!

Mix the above ingredients together, reserving the sugar and yeast for last: sprinkle them on top.

Mix on low to medium for about 10 minutes.

Smear a large bowl with olive oil. Go ahead and use your fingers- it's fun! Then, dump the dough into the oily bowl, and cover with plastic wrap.

Let rise for 2 1/2 hours. Go to Church- it will be ready when you return!

Pour the dough from the bowl into a jelly roll pan, or else try a cookie sheet, or else make into small, thin pizzas and grill them directly on the charcoal grill... having trouble lighting that grill? See my other video...
And, if you have one of those worthless gas grills, sell it to buy that Kitchenaid!!

Then, using an oil-covered plastic spatula, spread the dough around the pan. (And also use your oily fingers.)
Now, top this oily, silky dough with:
1. Cheese
2. Thinly sliced Tomatoes
3. Peppers and caramelized onions
4. Italian seasoning
5. Whatever else your little, oily-handed heart desires

Put on your red-hot, CHARCOAL burning Weber, if in a pan for about 30 minutes.... much less for small, thin, directly on the grill pizzas.

Transfer to a cutting board, and use your rolling pizza slicer that you also bought with the proceeds from that gas grill...

All done! Then comes the best part of all..........EAT!!!!


video video

Monday, January 28, 2008

Chocolate muffins!


Many have asked me:

"What did you do on vacation"? (Last week)

"Well", I replied "For one thing, I baked some chocolate muffins, preparatory to starting my new route on French Island!

"But how does a recipe such as this fall within the parameters of Vintage Health and Fitness ?

Because, I made them healthy! And you can, too!!

Here's how:

Eliminate the sugar, and substitute Splenda.

It comes in a box, and measures just like Sugar.

Mailman (Chocolate) Muffins-

2/3 cup of baking cocoa (dutched cocoa is the BEST!)
2 large eggs (eggs are really good for you, despite what you've read!)
1 cup (semi-sweet) chocolate chips (also good for you, despite the (small) sugar content
1/2 cup SPLENDA ( 0 calories)
2 tsp baking soda
1 1/3 cups milk (whole milk is the best for you; but all milk is good!)
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Coat muffin tin with non-stick cooking spray.

In a large bowl, combine the cocoa, flour, sugar, baking soda, salt and vanilla.

Stir in half a cup of chocolate chips

In a separate bowl, combine the eggs and milk.

Add the egg/milk mixture to the other ingredients until moistened.

Scoop the batter evenly into the prepared muffin tin.

Sprinkle with the remaining chocolate chips! (There are a LOT! Enjoy eating a few; but not too many, since when they come out half melted they are REALLY GOOD!) Did I tell you that chocolate is GOOD for you???

Bake for 20 minutes, or until a wooden toothpick inserted comes out clean... (Ha ha- just bake for 20 minutes!!)

Cool on a wire rack.

That's how you' re supposed to do it..

In the interest of full disclosure, I will here reveal that I:

Didn't use any "separate bowls" :
I just dumped all the ingredients into one BIG bowl!

And then, I only stirred the ingredients the minimum amount of time to blend them all together-


this is crucial for muffins- don't overstir!

Then, I baked them, for 20 minutes...

No toothpicks passed through my hands; trust me!

I took them out, posed for a "muffin picture", and then...

Ate those bad boys!!

Next time:

Healthy Hot Chocolate